1911 Revolution Memorial Museum

1911 Revolution Memorial Museum ulasan, Guangzhou

1911 Revolution Memorial Museum
3.5
Komentar pengguna
Douglas M
Oleh Douglas M
Everybody Who was Anybody Gets a Mention
Agt 2020
On our perambulations to other attractions on the small island of ChangZhou, Wenta Tower of Shenjing (TA reviewed July 2018) and The Former Site of Whampoa Military Academy (TA Reviewed Sept 2016), I’ve seen signs for the 1911 museum. I’m a bit of a history buff and SWMBO and I have visited any of the sites related to the revolutionary goings on here in GuangZhou, so it seemed a worthwhile place to visit. Getting there for us meant a stroll across the road and catching the No. 1 bus for the journey to University City, and then finding a No. 383 bus to take us to the museum. We alighted after an hour from the No 1 bus which runs every 30 minutes from BaiYun Shan West gate at GuangZhong Yi (GZ Chinese Medical University) bus stop and then walked back about 200 meters to the intersection and turned right and walked past another entrance to GuangZhou University of Chinese Medicine and patiently waited for 20 minutes at the GuaungZhong Yi Lu Entrance bus stop for a No. 383 bus. This bus took us to the museum, be aware the bus stop you want is ChangZhou Civic Centre. Note: As we waited for the No. 383 bus I noticed the return bus stop across the road, and just before it a petrol station which was a handy marker as most of the bus stops look the same. Note: Get a GZ travel card and top it up. Fares are around ¥2, and there’s no change for cash. Just put the card on the reader as you get on the bus, the reader will show you the fare and the balance on your card. These days you must wear a mask and have your temperature checked by the driver as you get on. When we got off the bus we were going to walk the 200 metres indicated by the big brown tourist road sign (this is for the car park and South entrance) but a helpful local pointed to the ‘local’ pedestrian North gate entrance about 50 metres away further from the bus stop. Note: like most museums it’s closed on Mondays. At the gate SWMBO had to register sort out the phone app for tracking. This foreign devil couldn’t be trusted to do such a thing. I waved my SuiKang (GZ Health Check) code resident on my mobile phone at them which amazed them and sorted things out. After screening our bags in we went at 2 o’clock. By the way, entrance is free but at the present time you’re expected to wear a face mask. The museum is a huge three-story modern building built in 2011 with no windows in any of the four flat grey walls. There are two themed exhibitions namely ‘Creating a New Era of Republic’, and ‘Cantonese Celebrities during the 1911 Revolution’. There’s a very nice leaflet available at the reception desk giving more details. As with most notices in the museum everything is in good English. There is a lift to all floors and the there’s no steps. Note: 1911 really means fifteen years before and fifteen years after 1911, so 1896 to 1926 would be a better description of the period covered. Inside the museum it’s quite gloomy and flash photograph isn’t allowed, but the displays are well it. There are thousands of photographs (some of rather grizzly executions) with captions in Chinese and English. Everybody who was anybody in one of the many revolutions throughout China between 1896 and 1926 gets a mention, sometimes more than once. Provincial and city revolutions all get a mention. Quite a few ‘scenes’ with mannequins displaying famous people which are great for selfies. There’s lots of paperwork from the era which to most Chinese is unreadable as it’s in the old script but SWMBO revels in this stuff. Anyway, SWMBO and I strolled around the museum. We noticed that we’d been to a few of the places mentioned such as the various cemeteries (HuangHuaGang 72 Martyrs, Four Martyrs’ Cemetery, GuangZhou Uprising Martyr’s Park), meeting places (GuangZhou Commune, Memorial Hall of China Communist party Third People’s Congress, 3.29 Uprising Headquarters, The Memorial Museum of Generalissimo Sun Yat-sen’s Mansion) and residences (Former residence of Jeme Tien Yow, Deng ShiChang Museum) all of which have a TA review. I must admit after an hour and one floor I was reeling from information overload and had completely lost track of who had assassinated who, who had died in prison, and how many failed revolutions Sun Yat-sen had started. However, I soldiered on just like Sun Yat-sen. SWMBO was reveling in it, informing me who was related to who. In the celebrities’ part I was more at home. I was particularly interested in Mr Feng Ru who constructed the first Chinese aeroplanes before being killed in crash in 1912. Surely a candidate for a ‘the first in China’ award. Jeme Tien Yow the railway engineer also gets a little mention (his former residence is well worth a visit). There are photos of the air-ship China which I’d never seen before, and various steam railway engines. There’s also a little about the founding of the ChangYu wine brand, cheers Zhang ZhenXun!. There’s also exhibits about founding of many industries. There’s so much! This museum is a cornucopia of information of the period 1896 to 1926. It’s not just about revolutions but social changes and the relations of China with the outside world especially Britain, Germany, America, Russia and Japan. By the way, which is not unusual in GuangDong, the Qing Dynasty get a bit of a bashing. Anyway, it took us three hours to stroll around the three floors. The museum closes at 5 o’clock which brought our visit to a rather neat conclusion. There are plenty of places to rest weary legs throughout the museum, and there are clean toilets on each floor, but there’s no café and I didn’t see any vending machines for drinks. There’s a water dispenser on the second floor where SWMBO topped up her tea flask which SWMBO said was a nice touch as no self-respecting Chinese person ventures far without a flask of tea. We came out of the museum by the North Gate, and crossed the road and turned left, walked 60 metres past the market to the bus stop and settled down to wait. Luckily the No. 383 bus came just as the heavens opened. The bus journey home was the reverse of the coming but torrential rain turned the expected one-hour journey from University City to GuangZhou into a near three hour stop-start nightmare.

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3.5
7 ulasan
Luar biasa
0
Sangat bagus
5
Biasa
2
Buruk
0
Sangat buruk
0

Douglas M
Guangzhou, Cina1.973 kontribusi
Everybody Who was Anybody Gets a Mention
Agt 2020
On our perambulations to other attractions on the small island of ChangZhou, Wenta Tower of Shenjing (TA reviewed July 2018) and The Former Site of Whampoa Military Academy (TA Reviewed Sept 2016), I’ve seen signs for the 1911 museum. I’m a bit of a history buff and SWMBO and I have visited any of the sites related to the revolutionary goings on here in GuangZhou, so it seemed a worthwhile place to visit.

Getting there for us meant a stroll across the road and catching the No. 1 bus for the journey to University City, and then finding a No. 383 bus to take us to the museum. We alighted after an hour from the No 1 bus which runs every 30 minutes from BaiYun Shan West gate at GuangZhong Yi (GZ Chinese Medical University) bus stop and then walked back about 200 meters to the intersection and turned right and walked past another entrance to GuangZhou University of Chinese Medicine and patiently waited for 20 minutes at the GuaungZhong Yi Lu Entrance bus stop for a No. 383 bus. This bus took us to the museum, be aware the bus stop you want is ChangZhou Civic Centre.

Note: As we waited for the No. 383 bus I noticed the return bus stop across the road, and just before it a petrol station which was a handy marker as most of the bus stops look the same.

Note: Get a GZ travel card and top it up. Fares are around ¥2, and there’s no change for cash. Just put the card on the reader as you get on the bus, the reader will show you the fare and the balance on your card. These days you must wear a mask and have your temperature checked by the driver as you get on.
When we got off the bus we were going to walk the 200 metres indicated by the big brown tourist road sign (this is for the car park and South entrance) but a helpful local pointed to the ‘local’ pedestrian North gate entrance about 50 metres away further from the bus stop.

Note: like most museums it’s closed on Mondays.

At the gate SWMBO had to register sort out the phone app for tracking. This foreign devil couldn’t be trusted to do such a thing. I waved my SuiKang (GZ Health Check) code resident on my mobile phone at them which amazed them and sorted things out. After screening our bags in we went at 2 o’clock.

By the way, entrance is free but at the present time you’re expected to wear a face mask.

The museum is a huge three-story modern building built in 2011 with no windows in any of the four flat grey walls. There are two themed exhibitions namely ‘Creating a New Era of Republic’, and ‘Cantonese Celebrities during the 1911 Revolution’. There’s a very nice leaflet available at the reception desk giving more details. As with most notices in the museum everything is in good English. There is a lift to all floors and the there’s no steps.

Note: 1911 really means fifteen years before and fifteen years after 1911, so 1896 to 1926 would be a better description of the period covered.

Inside the museum it’s quite gloomy and flash photograph isn’t allowed, but the displays are well it. There are thousands of photographs (some of rather grizzly executions) with captions in Chinese and English. Everybody who was anybody in one of the many revolutions throughout China between 1896 and 1926 gets a mention, sometimes more than once. Provincial and city revolutions all get a mention. Quite a few ‘scenes’ with mannequins displaying famous people which are great for selfies. There’s lots of paperwork from the era which to most Chinese is unreadable as it’s in the old script but SWMBO revels in this stuff.

Anyway, SWMBO and I strolled around the museum. We noticed that we’d been to a few of the places mentioned such as the various cemeteries (HuangHuaGang 72 Martyrs, Four Martyrs’ Cemetery, GuangZhou Uprising Martyr’s Park), meeting places (GuangZhou Commune, Memorial Hall of China Communist party Third People’s Congress, 3.29 Uprising Headquarters, The Memorial Museum of Generalissimo Sun Yat-sen’s Mansion) and residences (Former residence of Jeme Tien Yow, Deng ShiChang Museum) all of which have a TA review.

I must admit after an hour and one floor I was reeling from information overload and had completely lost track of who had assassinated who, who had died in prison, and how many failed revolutions Sun Yat-sen had started. However, I soldiered on just like Sun Yat-sen. SWMBO was reveling in it, informing me who was related to who.

In the celebrities’ part I was more at home. I was particularly interested in Mr Feng Ru who constructed the first Chinese aeroplanes before being killed in crash in 1912. Surely a candidate for a ‘the first in China’ award. Jeme Tien Yow the railway engineer also gets a little mention (his former residence is well worth a visit). There are photos of the air-ship China which I’d never seen before, and various steam railway engines. There’s also a little about the founding of the ChangYu wine brand, cheers Zhang ZhenXun!. There’s also exhibits about founding of many industries. There’s so much!

This museum is a cornucopia of information of the period 1896 to 1926. It’s not just about revolutions but social changes and the relations of China with the outside world especially Britain, Germany, America, Russia and Japan. By the way, which is not unusual in GuangDong, the Qing Dynasty get a bit of a bashing.

Anyway, it took us three hours to stroll around the three floors. The museum closes at 5 o’clock which brought our visit to a rather neat conclusion.

There are plenty of places to rest weary legs throughout the museum, and there are clean toilets on each floor, but there’s no café and I didn’t see any vending machines for drinks. There’s a water dispenser on the second floor where SWMBO topped up her tea flask which SWMBO said was a nice touch as no self-respecting Chinese person ventures far without a flask of tea.

We came out of the museum by the North Gate, and crossed the road and turned left, walked 60 metres past the market to the bus stop and settled down to wait. Luckily the No. 383 bus came just as the heavens opened.

The bus journey home was the reverse of the coming but torrential rain turned the expected one-hour journey from University City to GuangZhou into a near three hour stop-start nightmare.
Ditulis pada 27 Agustus 2020
Ulasan ini adalah opini subjektif dari anggota Tripadvisor, bukan dari TripAdvisor LLC.

Roddy P
Johannesburg, Afrika Selatan822 kontribusi
Fist class museum and memorial to the beginnings of the New China
Jul 2019 • Sendiri
Not the easiest place to get to - i was visiting the Whampoa Military Academy and decided to go there too - caught a motorbike taxi - and i was so glad i went.

Its free to get in and the museum / memorial is on three levels. It was opened in 2011 to celebrate 100 years since the uprising and the end of fuedilisim and the Emperor.

It focuses a lot on the political movements prior to the revolution and the impact of the Sino Japanese war and the European and american imperialists on China, its people and politics. There are some very interesting statements which give you a sense of what modern china is about.

I found it fascinating, if a little bit overwhelming as there is a lot to absorb.

I am not sure how you get there - taxi - as the nearest metro is far away - Higher Education Mega Center South
Ditulis pada 28 Juli 2019
Ulasan ini adalah opini subjektif dari anggota Tripadvisor, bukan dari TripAdvisor LLC.
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